Tag Archives: wearable technology

A Hug for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Wearable Technology Lab graduate research assistant Julia Duvall (Apparel Design ‘15) and undergraduate research assistant Nicholas Schleif (Electrical Engineering & Product Design) won the student design competition at the 2016 Augmented Human conference in Geneva, Switzerland with their deep pressure vest that “hugs” children with sensory processing disorder. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder often shy away from physical touch even […]

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The Future of Wearable Tech: Q & A with Brad Holschuh

Brad Holschuh officially begins his appointment as Assistant Professor and Co-Director of the Wearable Technology Lab in January, but he’s already learning the ropes, working with graduate students, and jumping into projects—including a recreation of Marty McFly’s 2015 self-tailoring jacket for Back to the Future Day. He holds a PhD in Aerospace Biomedical Engineering from MIT, where he worked on […]

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What Do Gloves That Type and A Noise Cancelling Vest Have in Common?

Apparel design students will present their innovative prototypes at Johnson Space Center during a trip to NASA headquarters April 19-21. The students researched and developed garments for NASA over the semester and now have the opportunity to show their work to the astronauts. Prototypes by the five teams, as pictured, include gloves that type, a space suit outer layer that enhances range of motion, research into placement of devices on the body, a noise cancelling vest, and a radiation resistant cargo bag that transformed into a wearable garment. MORE: Behind the scenes preparing for NASAThis is the third year the class has partnered with NASA and focused on wearable technology. This spring associate professor Lucy Dunne received NASA's Silver Achievement…

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Lucy Dunne Receives NASA's Silver Achievement Medal

Associate professor Lucy Dunne (Apparel Design) will receive NASA's Silver Achievement Medal during a ceremony at NASA's Johnson Space Center on April 21, 2014.This prestigious NASA Silver Achievement Medal is awarded to Government and non-Government individuals or teams by NASA Center Directors for a stellar achievement that supports one or more of NASA's Core Values, when it is deemed to be extraordinarily important and appropriate to recognize such achievement in a timely and personalized manner. Dunne helped develop the NASA Wearable Technology Clutser, which brings together NASA scientists and engineers on the one side, and university students and professors on the other from the University of Minnesota, Virginia Tech and Georgia Tech. Since 2012, she has offered a course each…

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Universal Smart Garments Coming to a Closet Near You?

Assistant Professor Lucy Dunne (Apparel) has received the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award, also known as the CAREER award. She will receive nearly $400,000 in NSF funding over the next four years to develop a cut-and-sewn, textile-integrated smart clothing platform. Dunne paired her early textiles and apparel career with an education in electronic technology. "I didn't face the same obstacles as people who are trained only in apparel and then turn to smart clothing later," she explains. Today, it's Dunne's goal that every student who graduates from the apparel design program leaves confident with the knowledge that they know how to build a least a very basic circuit. It goes hand in hand with her teaching…

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Making The Shoe Fit … Even Better

If the shoe doesn’t fit … design something better. In the spring of 2012, students in Lucy Dunne’s Studio IV apparel design course partnered with NASA to design wearable technology prototypes. Susan Vue, Jennifer Voth, and Melissa Mello developed a better boot for astronauts. This fall, their design won first place in the 2012 Safety Products Student Design Challenge sponsored by Safety + Technical Products and Narrow Fabrics Institute (IFAI).  “This project is a great example,” explains Voth, who graduates in the spring, “of how combining two components of design that rarely meet, in this case spacesuit engineering and general apparel design, creates innovative solutions that normally would not be apparent if these two worlds hadn’t met.”       The…

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Apparel and Graphic Design Students Attend International Symposium on Wearable Computing

Apparel and graphic design students from the College of Design, along with assistant professor Lucy Dunne (Apparel Design), attended the 2012 International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC) in Newcastle, UK, June 18-22. Tony Carton (MFA Graphic Design) was awarded "Most Innovative Concept" for his context-aware signal glove. Using LED signals, the glove allows the bicyclist or motorcyclist to focus on riding, while the glove responds to and extends the visibility of the rider's hand gestures. "For bicycle and motorcycle riders, visibility is a constant concern for safe riding," explains Carton. "This illuminated riding glove uses off the shelf sensors to recognize common hand gestures used by riders and actuates appropriate LED patterns to enhance the visibility of the gesture."…

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Apparel Design Students Take Wearable Technology to NASA Headquarters

As NASA’s Discovery space shuttle makes it’s final flight over D.C., 16 students in Lucy Dunne’s Studio IV apparel design course are on their own mission: completing work on their wearable technology designs before presenting them at NASA headquarters on Friday, April 27. KSTP-TV interviewed Dunne and her students as they make final preparations for the trip.What does wearable technology look like? Here’s are two examples. A hands-free garment for computing systems that holds your electronics and feels comfortable. And a garment with a built-in warning systems to alert wearers to possible dangers with tactile and visual senors. Pictured below is the garment Jessica Loomis, Mai Yang, and Grace Loring produced for consumer use, compatible with the technology that someday might…

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